Patient resources to help along the way

Education and support resources for patients taking Toujeo®

    Insulin, Glucose and You

    Insulin and Glucose

    When you hear the word insulin, you may think of a drug taken by people who have diabetes.

    While this is true, what you may not know is that insulin is one of the many hormones created in the human body.

    Insulin is important to the body. It allows blood sugar (or glucose) to get into cells to provide them with energy.

    When you eat, your body breaks down food into glucose in your small intestine.

    This is your body’s source of energy for everything it does, from working and thinking to exercising and healing.

    Glucose travels through your bloodstream, looking for individual cells that need energy.

    For glucose to get into the cells, it requires insulin.

    Insulin is the key that unlocks cells for glucose to enter and deliver energy.

    When insulin arrives, it signals the cell to activate glucose transporters.

    These transporters pull glucose through cell walls.

    When glucose moves into the cell, it delivers energy.


    Insulin Deficiency

    Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas by specialized cells called beta cells.

    When glucose enters your bloodstream, the pancreas matches it with the right amount of insulin to move glucose into your cells.

    In people with diabetes, this process doesn't work as it should. In type 1 diabetes, scientists believe the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys beta cells in the pancreas. A person with type 1 diabetes loses the ability to produce insulin.

    In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is not producing enough insulin to meet the body's needs. Over time, the amount of insulin typically becomes less and less.


    Insulin Resistance

    In some type 2 diabetes patients, cells build up a resistance to insulin. Even though there may be insulin in the bloodstream, it is not enough to unlock cells to allow glucose to enter.

    As a result, it takes more insulin to find the right key to unlock the cell for glucose. This makes it more difficult for cells to get the energy they need.


    The Effects of Diabetes

    When glucose can't get into cells—either because there isn't enough insulin or because the body is resisting it—glucose begins to build up in the bloodstream.

    As a result, all that energy is wasted. It does not get to cells where it is needed. Without glucose in your cells, they lack the energy they require to keep your body working.

     

    Select a resource below to preview or download the document.
     

    Hypoglycemia Safety

    Tips for patients about understanding hypoglycemia

    Blood Sugar Log

    Form for tracking blood glucose values through the week

    Meal Planning and Exercise Tips

    Tips for keeping active to stay healthy
     

    Select a resource below to preview or download the document.
     

    Toujeo® Dosing Guide


    Information on the initiation and titration of Toujeo

    Toujeo® SoloStar Instructions for Use

    Instructions for Use
     

    Toujeo® Max SoloStar® Instructions for Use

    Instructions for Using the Toujeo Max SoloStar pen

    Toujeo® Titration Worksheet

    Completed by a healthcare professional, this form provides dosing instructions to patients

    English

    How to Prepare for and Inject Toujeo®

    Supplemental instructions for patients using the Toujeo pens


Frequently Asked Questions

Select a question below for helpful information.

    • Start Toujeo at the dose prescribed by your doctor

    After you start Toujeo

    • Your doctor may adjust your insulin dose
    • Be sure to take Toujeo once a day at the same time each day
    • Be sure to review the full Instructions for Use for Toujeo
    • Toujeo is injected under your skin
    • Rotate injection site within these regions from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy and localized cutaneous amyloidosis. Do not inject into affected areas.

    Toujeo pens can be used for up to 56 days once opened.

    • Keep opened pens at room temperature, below 86ºF (30ºC) and away from direct heat and light
    • Do not refrigerate Toujeo pens after opening

    Your doctor may change your Toujeo dose several times in the first few weeks. This is to be expected. There are many reasons your doctor might increase your dose, and it’s a part of a process to help manage your blood sugar levels. If your dose increases, it doesn’t mean you’re doing anything wrong. Working together, you and your doctor will find the appropriate dose for you.

    Remember:

    When you start on Toujeo, it could take at least 5 days for Toujeo to reach its full activity in patients with T1DM.
    Keep track of your blood sugar levels and your insulin dose, following the schedule worked out with your doctor.

    Download a free
    Blood Sugar Log

    For all insulins, including Toujeo, the most common side effect is hypoglycemia. Ask your doctor about the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, how to monitor your blood sugar, and what to do if you have a hypoglycemic event.
    More about side effects.
     

Prior authorization

Sanofi Patient Connection can help your office obtain prior authorization for access to Toujeo

Additional professional resources

Find the full list of resources for Toujeo

 

Toujeo is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients 6 years and older with diabetes mellitus.

Limitations of Use: Toujeo is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Contraindications

Toujeo is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients.

Warnings and Precautions

Toujeo contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo is 300 units per mL.

Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles.

Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin regimen, strength, manufacturer, type, injection site or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia.

Repeated insulin injections into areas of lipodystrophy or localized cutaneous amyloidosis may result in hyperglycemia; sudden change in the injection site (to unaffected area) has been reported to result in hypoglycemia. Advise patients to rotate injection site to unaffected areas and closely monitor for hypoglycemia.

Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus.

Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo, and may be life-threatening.

Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection.

Do not dilute or mix Toujeo with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Toujeo via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur.

Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Toujeo, monitor and treat if indicated.

A reduction in the Toujeo dose may be required in patients with renal or hepatic impairment.

As with all insulins, Toujeo use can lead to life-threatening hypokalemia. Untreated hypokalemia may cause respiratory paralysis, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. Closely monitor potassium levels in patients at risk of hypokalemia and treat if indicated.

Fluid retention, which may lead to or exacerbate heart failure, can occur with concomitant use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) with insulin. These patients should be observed for signs and symptoms of heart failure. If heart failure occurs, dosage reduction or discontinuation of TZD must be considered.

Drug Interactions

Certain drugs may affect glucose metabolism, requiring insulin dose adjustment and close monitoring of blood glucose. The signs of hypoglycemia may be reduced in patients taking anti-adrenergic drugs (e.g., beta-blockers, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine).

Adverse Reactions

Adverse reactions commonly associated with Toujeo include hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, injection site reactions, lipodystrophy, pruritus, rash, edema and weight gain.

Important Safety Information for Toujeo SoloStar® and Toujeo Max SoloStar®

Toujeo SoloStar and Toujeo Max SoloStar are single-patient-use prefilled insulin pens. To help ensure an accurate dose each time, patients should follow all steps in the Instruction Leaflet accompanying the pen; otherwise they may not get the correct amount of insulin, which may affect their blood glucose levels. It is especially important to perform a safety test when a patient is using a new pen for the first time.

Do not withdraw Toujeo from the SoloStar and Max SoloStar single-patient-use prefilled pens with a syringe.

Click here for full Prescribing Information.

Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

Click here to learn more about Sanofi's commitment to fighting counterfeit drugs.

All registered trademarks cited are property of their respective owners.

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Contraindications

Toujeo is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients.

Warnings and Precautions

Toujeo contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo is 300 units per mL.

Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles.

Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin regimen, strength, manufacturer, type, injection site or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia.

Repeated insulin injections into areas of lipodystrophy or localized cutaneous amyloidosis may result in hyperglycemia; sudden change in the injection site (to unaffected area) has been reported to result in hypoglycemia. Advise patients to rotate injection site to unaffected areas and closely monitor for hypoglycemia.

Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus.

Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo, and may be life-threatening.

Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection.

Do not dilute or mix Toujeo with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Toujeo via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur.

Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Toujeo, monitor and treat if indicated.

A reduction in the Toujeo dose may be required in patients with renal or hepatic impairment.

As with all insulins, Toujeo use can lead to life-threatening hypokalemia. Untreated hypokalemia may cause respiratory paralysis, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. Closely monitor potassium levels in patients at risk of hypokalemia and treat if indicated.

Fluid retention, which may lead to or exacerbate heart failure, can occur with concomitant use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) with insulin. These patients should be observed for signs and symptoms of heart failure. If heart failure occurs, dosage reduction or discontinuation of TZD must be considered.

Drug Interactions

Certain drugs may affect glucose metabolism, requiring insulin dose adjustment and close monitoring of blood glucose. The signs of hypoglycemia may be reduced in patients taking anti-adrenergic drugs (e.g., beta-blockers, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine).

Adverse Reactions

Adverse reactions commonly associated with Toujeo include hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, injection site reactions, lipodystrophy, pruritus, rash, edema and weight gain.

Important Safety Information for Toujeo SoloStar® and Toujeo Max SoloStar®

Toujeo SoloStar and Toujeo Max SoloStar are single-patient-use prefilled insulin pens. To help ensure an accurate dose each time, patients should follow all steps in the Instruction Leaflet accompanying the pen; otherwise they may not get the correct amount of insulin, which may affect their blood glucose levels. It is especially important to perform a safety test when a patient is using a new pen for the first time.

Do not withdraw Toujeo from the SoloStar and Max SoloStar single-patient-use prefilled pens with a syringe.

Click here for full Prescribing Information.

Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

Click here to learn more about Sanofi's commitment to fighting counterfeit drugs.

All registered trademarks cited are property of their respective owners.